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Connecticut Board of Regents for Higher Education

Concentration - Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of people within their cultural context. This concentration follows traditional college curricula from foundation courses through advanced study with credits earned at the appropriate levels. It takes a global view of human cultures from pre-historical time to the present, integrating social sciences, natural science and humanities. This concentration requires a minimum of 36 credits.

Concentration Requirements:

Requirement Credits Examples
Physical Anthropology 3 Physical Anthropology
Social Anthropology 3 Social Anthropology
Anthropological Theory 3 Anthropological Theory
Human Adaptation and Diversity 3 Human Adaptation and Diversity
Cultural Anthropology 3 Cultural Anthropology
Exploration of Distinctive Cultures 9 Americans, Asia, Africa, Near East and Oceania
Anthropology of Contemporary Institutions or Societies 3 Anthropology of Contemporary Institutions or Societies
Ethnographic Research 3 Ethnographic Research
Electives in Anthropology 3  
Capstone 3 ANT 499 (Culminating course in concentration)
TOTAL 36  
Note:Only grades of C of higher may be included in the concentration.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a concentration in Anthropology will be able to:
  1. demonstrate knowledge of anthropological theory and the history of the discipline;
  2. demonstrate understanding of substantive sub-specialties in the discipline, including Cultural Anthropology and Physical Anthropology;
  3. use research methods including ethnographic investigation, participant observation, and ethnohistory;
  4. compare and contrast distinctive culture areas of anthropology, including North and South America, Asia, Africa, and the near East and Oceania;
  5. demonstrate understanding of the contemporary anthropological study of advanced industrial societies in the area of medicine, education, urban, and political anthropology;
  6. discuss the ethical and political issues associated with the anthropological study of post-colonialism, neo-imperialism, and globalization; and
  7. apply critical thinking that employs anthropological theories and methods to analyze questions.