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Concentration - Sociology

Sociology

Sociology is the study of group life: its characteristics, values, changes, causes and consequences. It employs scientific and humanistic perspectives in the study of urban and rural life, family patterns and relationships, social change, inter-group relationships, social class, environment, technology and communications, health-seeking behavior, and social movements. This concentration requires a minimum of 36 credits.

Concentration Requirements:

                                                                                          

Requirements

Credits

Methodology of Social Research

3 credits

Statistics and/or Probability Theory

3 credits

Sociological Theory

3 upper level credits

Choose three:

Social Stratification, Organizations,
  Social Psychology, Urban/Rural
  Sociology, Family, Ethnic Relations,
  Social Change

9 upper level credits

Sociology Electives for a cohesive program of study

15 credits

Capstone

3 credits

TOTAL

36  

 

Notes: Only grades of C or higher may be included in the concentration.

An introductory sociology course is a pre-requisite for this concentration. Courses in social work are not acceptable.

Student Learning Outcomes

Students who graduate with a concentration in Sociology will be able to:

  1. use qualitative and quantitative research methodologies, including statistical reasoning, research design, and evaluation of data;
  2. identify key concepts of classical and contemporary sociological theory;
  3. evaluate societal institutions and social processes, e.g., stratification, racial and ethnic groups, gender, family, urban, work, health care, and education;
  4. relate sociological research to social policy formation;
  5. explain the relationship between personal experience and societal change within an historical/global context; and
  6. synthesize their learning of the concentration through a research paper, project, portfolio, or practicum.