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HIS 395: Historiography

Course Description

This course will focus on the development of significant historical interpretations from the ancient Greeks to current popular and oral history. This course considers the ideas of an array of historians whose interpretations have shaped how we understand our past. In varying units students inspect the writings of prominent historians, such as Herodotus, Petrarch, Voltaire, Leopold von Ranke, Karl Marx, Arnold Toynbee, Frederick Jackson Turner, and Howard Zinn. Themes of study include the study of work of prominent scholars in the context of historical events, methodological approaches to writing history, and the challenges associated with interpreting and understanding the past.

Prerequisites

  • ENG 101: English Composition 1
  • ENG 102: English Composition 2
  • 12 credits in History (Recommended)

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Identify the historical theory and methods involved in researching and writing history as measured by the completion of a research project that will:
    • Discuss the work of prominent scholars on chosen historical events as evidenced by a literature review with the research paper.
    • Discuss and analyze research methods used in the writing of history as evidenced in a review a methodological approach/es in writing history.
    • Compare and contrast scholars’ interpretations of a chosen historical event in the body of the research paper.
  2. Identify, describe, and evaluate the major developments, trends and issues in historiography as measured by participation in weekly discussion boards.
    • Compare and contrast the developments, trends and issues in historiography.
  3. Explain the evidentiary value of sources as evidence by the completion of a research project that demonstrates an analysis of:
    • Interpret and analyze primary source material.
    • Interpret and analyze secondary source material.
  4. Differentiate and discuss the assumptions, biases, goals and motives of historians that affect the studying and writing of history as measured by discussion board assignments, the midterm, the research paper, and the course final exam.
  5. Discuss history as discipline and the obligations and/or privileges associated with being a historian as evidenced by the course final exam.

General Education Outcomes (GEOs)

Please check the applicable GEOs for this course, if any, by outcomes at GEO Category Search, or by subject area at GEO Discipline Search.

Course Activities and Grading

AssignmentsWeight

Discussion Boards (Weekly)

10%

Weekly Reading Responses (except weeks 7 & 15)

20%

Research Paper Proposal (Week 4)

10%

Midterm Exam (Week 7)

10%

Research Paper Annotated Bibliography (Week 8)

10%

Introduction and Thesis Assignment (Week 9)

5%

Full Draft of Research Paper Draft (Week 13)

10%

Final Draft Research Paper (Week 15)

20%

Final Exam (Week 15)

10%

Total

100%

Required Textbooks

Available through Charter Oak's online bookstore

  • Hoefferle, Caroline. The Essential Historiography Reader. Pearson, 2010. ISBN: 0321437624.
  • Jenkins, Keith. Rethinking History, 3rd Edition. Routledge Classics, 2012. ISBN: 0415304431.
  • Stunkel, Kenneth R. Fifty Key Works of History and Historiography, 2011. ISBN: 0415573327.
  • Tosh, Jonathan. Historians on History, Second Edition. New York: Pearson Longman, 2009. ISBN: 1405801689.

Course Schedule

WeekSLOsReadings and ExercisesAssignments

1

1-4

What is Historiography? Why study it?

Read:

  • Review Syllabus
  • Review Research Paper Assignment Instructions & Rubric
  • Lecture, Part 1: Introduction to Historiography
  • Lecture, Part 2: Critically Analyzing Histories
  • Jenkins: Preface, Introduction;
  • Hoefferle: Introduction: What is Historiography?
  • Tosh: Introduction
  • Collingwood Excerpt

Watch:

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response

2

1-4

Writing History and Historical Lenses

Read:

  • Review COSC Plagiarism Policy
  • Lecture: Writing History and Historical Lenses
  • Jenkins: Chapter 1
  • Tosh: Chapter 1 and 2
  • History and Plagiarism (attached
    articles)
  • Why Write History, The History Guide

Watch:

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Research Paper Topic Exploration -- begin working on Research Paper Proposal Assignment (due week 4)

3

1-4

Early Histories & Truth, Subjectivity and Bias in Writing History

Read:

  • Lecture, Part 1: “Early Histories”
  • Lecture, Part 2: “Truth, Subjectivity & Bias in Writing Histories”
  • Jenkins Chapter 2
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 1: Early Histories
  • Tosh: Chapters 3 & 4
  • Stunkle: 1-4
  • McCullagh Article
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue working on Research Paper Proposal Assignment (due week 4)

4

1-2, 4

Modern History & Understanding Frameworks

Read:

  • Lecture: “Modern History & Understanding Frameworks”
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 2
  • Tosh: Chapters 5 & 6
  • Making History
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Submit Research Paper Proposal
  • Peer Review of Research Paper Topics in Discussion Board

5

1-3

Research and Evaluating Sources

Read:

  • Lecture: “Researching History: Primary and Secondary Sources”
  • Lecture: “Evaluating Sources”
  • Jenkins: Chapter 3
  • Stunkle: 5-16
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Begin working on Annotated Works Cited Page (due week 7)

6

1-3

Marxism & Interpretation/19th Century Historiography

Read:

  • Lecture: “Marxism & Interpretation”
  • Hoefferle: Chapters 3 & 4
  • Tosh: Chapters 10-12
  • Stunkle: 18-25

Watch:

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue working on Annotated Works Cited Page (due week 7)

7

1-4

Writing the Historiographical Essay

Read:

  • Lecture: “Writing the Historiographical Essay”
  • “Writing History”
  • “Historical Context”
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Complete Midterm Exam

8

1-4

20th Century Historiography

Read:

  • Lecture: “20th Century Historiography
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 5
  • Stunkle: 34-40

Watch:

Open “email” office hours posted for this week for student meetings.

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Submit Annotated Works Cited (7 sources)
  • Begin working on Introduction and Thesis Assignment (due week 9)

9

1-4

Social History

Read:

  • Lecture: “Social History”
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 7
  • Tosh: Chapters 28-33
  • Stunkle: 41-45
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Submit Thesis & Introduction Assignment
  • Share REVISED Introduction & Thesis Statements on the Discussion Board
  • Begin working on Writing your Research Paper (due week 15)

10

1-4

Post-Modernism and Historical Fallacy

Read:

  • Lecture: “Post-modernism”
  • Lecture: “Historical Fallacy”
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 8
  • Tosh: 35-37
  • Stunkle: 46-50

Watch:

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue writing Research Paper (due week 15)

11

1-4

World Histories

Read:

  • Lecture: “World Histories”
  • Hoefferle: Chapter 9
  • Tosh: Chapters 19-21
  • Stunkle: 26-33
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Research Paper Progress Update
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue writing Research Paper (due week 15)

12

1-5

Cultural Histories

Read:

  • Lecture: “Cultural History”
  • Tosh: Chapters 38 & 39
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue writing Research Paper (due week 15)

13

1, 3-5

Who owns the past?

Watch:

  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue writing Research Paper (due week 15)
  • Submit FULL Draft of Research Paper

14

1-5

Marxism & Interpretation/19th Century Historiography

Read:

  • Lecture: “The Historian”
  • Lecture: “History Contested”
  • Hoefferle: Epilogue
  • Tosh: Chapters 42 & 43
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Read assigned readings
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Weekly Reading Response
  • Continue writing Research Paper (due week 15)

15

1-5

Final Week: Research Papers Due

Read:

  • No assigned readings this week.
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Submit Final Draft of Research Paper
  • Complete Final Exam
  • Submit COSC Course Evaluation

Final Exam
SLOs 1-5
Comprehensive, all readings for the term.

COSC Accessibility Statement

Charter Oak State College encourages students with disabilities, including non-visible disabilities such as chronic diseases, learning disabilities, head injury, attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, or psychiatric disabilities, to discuss appropriate accommodations with the Office of Accessibility Services at OAS@charteroak.edu.

COSC Policies, Course Policies, Academic Support Services and Resources

Students are responsible for knowing all Charter Oak State College (COSC) institutional policies, course-specific policies, procedures, and available academic support services and resources. Please see COSC Policies for COSC institutional policies, and see also specific policies related to this course. See COSC Resources for information regarding available academic support services and resources.