College Unbound Program

College Unbound Program

Program Reviewed

The Center for the Transformation of Higher Education and Big Picture Learning

Credits Available with Dates Valid

  • Assessment and Education: Focus in Early Childhood (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • City Seminars, 2 parts (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • Cultural Education (3 credits, upper division level) January 2010 through August 2018
  • Designing a 21st Century College (3 credits, upper division level) June 2013 through August 2018
  • Education and Community Development (3 credits, upper division level) September 2012 through August 2018
  • Expository Writing (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • Field Studies in Mentorship (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • Globalization and Education (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • Grants and Other Professional and Critical Writing (3 credits, upper division level) September 2010 through August 2018
  • History of American Higher Education (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
  • Lifelong Learning Seminar (3 credits, lower division level) September 2011 through August 2018
  • Public Communications (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018

Source of Records

College Unbound; Attn: Transcripts; 325 Public Street; Providence, RI 02905

About the Training Sponsor

College Unbound is a curricular initiative of non-profit organizations Big Picture Learning and the Center for the Transformation of Higher Education that integrates students' own purposes and visions for learning with the needs of their workplaces and communities. It seeks to raise the quality and applicability of students education, to improve postsecondary student accessibility, graduation, and long-term success rates, and to build students as leaders in their professional and personal lives. The program was opened in 2009 under the auspices of Rhode Island's Roger Williams University, in 2010 under Southern New Hampshire University, and has developed relationships with cohorts in both Providence and New Orleans.

Applying for the Credit

Have your training sponsor submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

Assessment and Education: Focus in Early Childhood (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2008
The assessment of young children's development and learning is one of the most challenging of all tasks performed by teachers. This course, with active contribution from class participants, explores the theoretical and particular applications of observing, documenting and assessing young children in early care and education settings. The course framework rests on the premise that ongoing, systematic observations and documentation and other formal and informal assessments are thoughtful and appreciative of young children's unique qualities, strengths, and needs. This array of assessment approaches is a critical and an essential element in gaining a deeper understanding of young children's learning and development; in developing appropriate learning goals for children; and in planning, implementing and evaluating effective curriculum and teaching and facilitating strategies.

City Seminars, 2 parts (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
"The City And..." is a multi-year, collaboratively designed and taught open community leadership course College Unbound, and other local community organizations. The seminar series is an iterative one and is premised on the importance of creating space for conversation with engaging speakers and community-based organizations that are conducting civic innovation. Participants may receive up to 12 credits from "The City And..." sequence of courses.

Cultural Education (3 credits, upper division level) January 2010 through August 2018
The Institution of Cultural Education (ICE) works to improve the cultural competence of educators working in early childhood programs. The key problem addressed by ICE is that educational achievement for African-American youth, especially is hindrance by the lack of culturally responsive teaching strategies in the classroom. The Ashe' Institute for Cultural Education seeks to redress this problem by providing effective teaching strategies to early childhood educators. The goal of ICE is to improve the cultural competence of ICE participants by strengthening their teaching skills and increasing their capacity to foster positive growth and development of African American children.

Designing a 21st Century College (3 credits, upper division level) June 2013 through August 2018
Designing a 21st Century College is a 3 credit, writing intensive and digital media training meant to connect student voice, research, digital literacy, and higher education history and current events.

Education and Community Development (3 credits, upper division level) September 2012 through August 2018
Education and Community Development is a course structured around fostering a discussion of the concepts and theories of how spaces of teaching, learning, and mentorship help to foster meaningful community development practices. Students will be tasked with connecting their present-day projects in Providence with historical and theoretical models of education for social change.

Expository Writing (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
This foundational course will prepare the College Unbound student to use expository writing as a tool for learning and communicating. Students will become adept at using writing to effectively explain, describe and inform. They will take advantage of the real world opportunities that surround them to identify and use the expectations of the discourse communities with which they choose to engage - engineering, politics, academia, etc. Understanding the discourse community determine how, when and where to use which expository style to achieve their purpose.

Field Studies in Mentorship (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
In this workshop series/mentorship seminar we will surface and examine these patterns, then explore a variety of ways we might reframe our approach to service and strengthening communities and one another. Through a conversational format inside class, and community engagement outside of it, and mentorship experiences with worksite mentors, we will start by focusing on ourselves. This initial focus will serve as a stepping-off point for a larger inquiry into collaborative work sites, services, and personal development.

Globalization and Education (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
This workshop will allow students to examine particular issues related to globalization as well as develop research skills to be actors in the world around them. Case study analysis will provide the focusing tool for the study of a specific issue area that will change from year to year.

Grants and Other Professional and Critical Writing (3 credits, upper division level) September 2010 through August 2018
This is writing directed at making change. This is writing in which the clarity of the content persuades others to direct people and resources in a particular ways. Professional writing is not completed in a social vacuum. It always involves considering the politics and ethics of the organization and the world in which it operates. Students will take advantage of the real world opportunities that surround them to identify and use the expectations of the audience with which they choose to engage - engineering, politics, education, health care, etc. Understanding the audience determines how, when and where to use which expository style to achieve their purpose.

History of American Higher Education (3 credits, upper division level) September 2009 through August 2018
This course deals with the history of higher education in the United States in its many facets - students, professors, administration, curricula, and organization. It is concerned with understanding the interplay of education and society through their history. As such, we will explore the historical roots of large questions related to higher education and their modern significance: Who should go to college? What should they study? Who should teach them? How should the system be funded? What should the purpose of education be? Is education a progressive force in society?

Lifelong Learning Seminar (3 credits, lower division level) September 2011 through August 2018
Understanding that learning is transformation, students work with their academic team to develop and maintain a personal learning plan that includes personal, academic and career goals. Academic underpinnings of writing support, network growth and personal development fill out the course requirements. In this course, students pay attention to how they are learning as well as what they are learning. The Lifelong Learning process requires ongoing application and development of the cognitive skills of diagnosis, planning, causation, judgment, describing, and negotiation.

Public Communications (3 credits, lower division level) September 2009 through August 2018
The purpose of this course is to give each student an understanding and appreciation of the importance of speaking in public and to help the student become and effective dynamic speaker to further their work - whether at their workplace, their commitment to a social issue, or other aims. Public speaking happens to large groups as well as intimate audiences and so oral exercises and readings throughout the quarter will serve as tools toward becoming an adept speaker, able to organize thoughts in a coherent fashion and express them in a meaningful engaging way. Grading will be determined through meaningful participation in group presentations and in-person conversations as well as online discussion threads, the development of 3 formal presentations throughout the quarter, and a deep understanding of the theories, practices and obstacles of meaningful public communication.