Global Education Network Courses

Global Education Network Courses

Credits Available with Dates Valid

  • Alexander the Great (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
  • American Cinema (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • American Passages: A Literary Survey, Part I (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • American Passages: A Literary Survey, Part II (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Art of the Western World (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • A Biography of America I (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • A Biography of America II (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Calculus I (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
  • Chemistry I (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
  • College Algebra: In Simplest Terms (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Dealing with Diversity (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Death: A Personal Understanding (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • English Composition: Writing for an Audience (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Ethics in America (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Exploring Society: Introduction to Sociology (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Exploring the World of Music (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Family Communication (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • For the Love of Wisdom (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Human Geography (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Inside the Global Economy (3 credits, upper division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Intermediate English Composition: Research for Writers (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Introduction to Computer Literacy (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Mechanical Universe (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Mechanical Universe and Beyond (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Multimedia Literacy (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Renaissance (3 credits, upper division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Voices and Visions (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Western Tradition, I (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Western Tradition, II (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • The Whole Child: A Caregiver's Guide to the First Five Years (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • Women and Social Action (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
  • U.S. History II: From Reconstruction to Modern Day (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through 2007
  • Understanding Mass Media (3 credits, upper division level) June 2000 through2007
  • Unseen Life on Earth: An Introduction to Microbiology (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007

Source of Records

Registrar; Global Education Network; 200 West 57th Street, Suite 1101; New York, NY 10019

About the Training Sponsor

Allen Technology, d/b/a Global Education Network (GEN) was founded in 1999 to create high quality computer-based courses for students in the liberal arts.

Applying for the Credit

Have your training sponsor submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

Alexander the Great (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
This courses draws strongly from the disciplines of classical studies, military studies, gender studies, religious studies, literature, political science, geography, history of the Mediterranean and Middle East, archaeology, and anthropology. Students develop the following skills, among others: how to read and analyze primary and secondary historical texts; how to "read" historical artifacts and archaeological sites; how to read maps and geographic terrain; and how to analyze military strategy.

American Cinema (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This basic level course is a study of American films. Students will study the history of the silent era, learn to recognize and the basic technical and critical vocabulary of motion pictures, and understand how the technology of the cinema relates to film art.

American Passages: A Literary Survey, Part I (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
This is the first part of a two-semester literature course that approaches its subject with an emphasis on imparting the student with a contextual understanding of American literature. Created to illuminate American literature by connecting canonical writers, and those less often taught, the 8 half-hour documentary programs explore works of fiction, prose, and poetry within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. These video programs, along with print guides and a rich Web site, take an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuities among them. This course encompasses the first part of the American Passages curriculum and covers Native Voices, Exploring Borderlands, Utopian Promise, Spirit of Nationalism, Masculine Heroes, Gothic Undercurrents, Slavery and Freedom, and Regional Realism.

American Passages: A Literary Survey, Part II (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
This is the second part of a two-semester literature course that approaches its subject with an emphasis on a contextual understanding of American literature. Created to illuminate American literature by connecting canonical writers and those less often taught, the course explores works of fiction, prose and poetry within their historical, social, and cultural contexts. Video programs, along with print guides and Web resources, take an expanded view of American literary movements, bringing in a diversity of voices and tracing the continuities among them. This course encompasses the second part of the American Passages curriculum and covers Social Realism, Rhythms in Poetry, Modernist Portraits, Migrant Struggle, Southern Renaissance, Becoming Visible, Poetry of Liberation, and Search for Identity. Students should expect a heavy course load of reading assignments. Prerequisite: American Passages Part I.

Art of the Western World (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This basic level course examines works of art that have defined the Western visual tradition from ancient Greece to the present day. The course helps students appreciate the formal qualities, iconography, historical importance of these extraordinary monuments. By studying these works in their original contexts, the course will show how they closely reflect the prevailing attitudes of the society in which they were created, as well as the goals of the artist and patrons responsible for their creation.

A Biography of America I (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This basic level course presents history not simply as a series of irrefutable facts to be memorized, but as a living narrative. Students will see the human side of American history-how historical figures affected events and the impact of these events of citizens' lives.

A Biography of America I (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This basic course follows the nation's progress from the celebration of its centennial through the last quarter of the 20th century, examining significant events and major players and challenging the learner to think critically about the meaning of American history.

Calculus I (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
This course is concerned with developing a student's understanding of the concepts of calculus and providing experience in its methods and applications. A multi-representational approach is emphasized, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, graphically, analytically, and verbally. Broad concepts and widely applicable methods, notations, and shortcuts are taught. Although memorization of rules and taxonomies for problems, functions, equations, etc. are consistently addressed, they serve as shells surrounding the core of the course, which is understanding the unifying themes of derivatives, integrals, limits, approximation, applications and modeling, both conceptually and how they impact daily life.

Chemistry I (3 credits, lower division level) June 2002 through 2007
The course is designed to introduce the student to the foundations of chemical science and its applications. Students learn the composition, structure and properties of substances; understand and solve common chemical problems; build quantitative skills applicable to all sciences; and develop an appreciation of the importance of attaining reproducible data from controlled experiments. They explore fundamental physical models; visualize chemical systems and relate them to everyday situations; and grasp connections between microscopic and macroscopic events.

College Algebra: In Simplest Terms (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This course was developed with the purpose of making mathematical concepts easy to understand and interesting to work with. Enlivened with computer graphics and documentary segments, the 26 half-hour video lessons lead students step-by-step to a thorough understanding of concepts and practical, real-life applications of algebra. This course will focus on radicals, exponents, complex numbers, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, and absolute value. Additional topics include exponential and logarithmic properties, graphs of linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations and inequalities and both arithmetic and geometric series.

Dealing with Diversity (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
In the last two decades, those who live in the industrialized West have witnessed dramatic changes in life conditions and lifestyle. Technological developments have quickened the tempo of everyday living, bringing people in closer contact than ever before. This intermediate level course looks with people from many diverse cultures and helps students understand the different constraints and motivations of people from diverse backgrounds.

Death: A Personal Understanding (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the who, what, where, when, why, and how of death in society. The primary course goals are to help students deepen their personal understanding of the many dimensions of this topic, to enable them to become more empathetic and effective caregivers and providers of support, and to provide them with tools to critique the "death care" system. The course provides a framework for understanding themes presented by experts drawn from fields as diverse as gerontology, psychology, religion, anthropology, nursing, social work, and history, and through actual case studies. Additional topics covered include research into death anxiety and "the death system".

English Composition: Writing for an Audience (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
An introductory writing course featuring interviews with professional writers and "regular" who must use writing every day in their jobs. Students examine different writing genres, and will understand how writers use description, narration, comparison, definition, process analysis, persuasion, and argument. The course shows how awareness of developing a voice, reading as a writer, reading as a thinker, and using quotations and citations affect the composition process. Also covered are what are often called "rhetorical modes" or "genres", showing how arguments, narratives, and definitions can be combined with critical thinking to improve communication skills. Students view composition as a continuous process of invention, drafting, rewriting, and proofreading, examining topics such as free-writing, organizing devices, revision, collaboration, peer feedback, editing, and techniques to help them write under pressure or across disciplines.

Ethics in America (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
This intermediate level course examines contemporary ethical conflicts and provides grounding in the language, concepts, and traditions of ethics. Students are provided the intellectual tools with which to analyze moral dilemmas in the field they choose to pursue and in society.

Exploring Society: Introduction to Sociology (3 credits, lower level); December 2003-2007
An introductory course that challenges students to expand their knowledge of sociology by increasing their awareness of social forces, communities, and human relationships. Students will recognize that they are at the crossroads of their personal experiences and social history. Stories and situations are used to dramatize the human conflicts at the core of all sociological issues. As they conclude this study they will be equipped to understand that to be social is to make decisions about how they participate in the human story. Course materials feature interviews with sociologists and other experts who have been chosen for their individual expertise, as well as for the diverse backgrounds, approaches, and viewpoints they bring to this production. Students explore unique sociological ideas through the use of short, intense visual vignettes, referred to as "Visual Sociology" or "Then and Now".

Exploring the World of Music (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
An introductory undergraduate course designed to create an understanding of the essential nature of music and its broad international cultural applications. Students explore the commonalities and the diverse uses of the basic musical elements- melody, form, rhythm, texture, timbre, harmony- that bind all music together, and reveal how these tools are used to provide sounds of infinite variety. The course examines theories about the origins of music-making and the role played by music in all cultures to stir human emotion and influence human activity. Students will discover how music is used to inspire religious feeling, prepare individuals for war, help people work, enhance games and play, and even stimulate the passion and love needed to propagate and nurture the human species. Students will also experience music made simply for its own sake, as art or entertainment, performed for others or for individual fulfillment.

Family Communication (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
In this course, students explore family communication in everyday life across a wide range of family types and family interaction patterns. The course examines the ways in which family members communicate, make decisions, settle conflict, and learn to relate to one another. Students develop an understanding of topics including: multigenerational communication; the impact of ethnicity of communication pattern; the role of everyday rituals; communication rules and stories in sustaining families, the development of intimacy among family members; family conflict models and conflict strategies; decision-making; characteristics of marital and family types; and changes in family interaction at different developmental stages. Insights and observations are shared by interactive student audience representing a diverse background of life experience.

For the Love of Wisdom (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This introductory course in philosophy begins with the familiar Western discourse and integrates women philosophers and both Asian and African philosophies throughout. The course offers an accessible entry point to the "big questions" of reality, knowledge, and value that form the core of philosophy. Rooted in the arts and popular culture as well as in traditional texts, the course draws students into the philosophical discourse and helps them explore its possibilities for their own lives. From the Axial Age during which major thought systems were created throughout the world, to the neurophysiology of the human brain, this course situates the Western philosophical tradition in a worldwide context and correlates it with insights from the arts, humanities, sciences, and social sciences.

Human Geography (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This course functions as a map to the cultural landscape of our time, providing a world perspective and helping students understand the lay of the land in terms of broad social patterns. Combining economic and cultural geography, the course examines the interrelationships between humans and the natural environment: the mode of production and wealth creation, and differences between one place and another in terms of the customs, mores, and institutions that create and maintain human societies. In Human Geography, these two types of geography are combined in holistic ways by focusing on multifaceted contemporary problems. One of the goals of the course is to integrate the disparate events of the present day into clearly recognizable trends, to provide students with an understanding of the causes behind dateline new events. The course helps students appreciate the interconnectedness of our world and recognize the impact that government, corporate, group, and individual decisions have on our lives.

Inside the Global Economy (3 credits, upper division level) December 2003 through 2007
This upper level course is designed to examine the prominent forces and core concepts of international economics and the relationships of nations and economic policy. The student will be given an international perspective on major economic issues and objectives and become acquainted with the institutions of global trade, business and finance. The course examines some of the central questions that are key to understanding the rapidly changing economic environment, such as: Global corporations: should they be feared or welcomed? Can countries stabilize exchange rates? How can industrial nations best assist the less developed countries?

Intermediate English Composition: Research for Writers (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
An introductory college level writing course featuring interviews with experts who present the principles of good writing, and interviews with working writers--- both professional writers and "regular" people-- who must use writing everyday in their "regular" jobs. Students will be exposed to several different writing genres throughout the duration of the course, and will understand how writers use description, narration, comparison, definition, process analysis, persuasion, and argument. Students learn how arguments, narration, and definitions can be combined with critical thinking to improve their communication skills. Students also examine techniques to help them writer under pressure or across disciplines. Topics include free-writing, organizing devices, revision, collaboration, peer feedback, and editing. Students learn how awareness of developing a voice, reading as a writer, reading as a thinker, and using quotations and citations affect the composition process.

Introduction to Computer Literacy (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This introductory course challenges students to expand their knowledge of sociology by increasing their awareness of social forces, communities, and human relationships. The course helps students understand how sociology can provide them with a new way of looking at the world. Students come to recognize that they are at the crossroads of their personal experience and social history. As they conclude this study they will understand that to be social is to make decisions about how they participate in the human story. Stories and situations are used to dramatize the human conflicts at the core of all sociological issues. Throughout the course, students explore unique sociological ideas through the use of short, intense visual vignettes, referred to as "Visual Sociology" or "Then and Now", that act as transitions between segments for many of the lessons.

Introduction to Macroeconomics (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
Macroeconomics teaches the essentials of macroeconomics theory and practiced. The lessons develop the concepts, strategies, and models required for analyzing key issues, including: Gross Domestic Product (GDP) and its components; the importance of interest rates, saving, and investment to economic growth; unemployment; the money supply, price levels, and inflation; international trade and capital flows; the aggregate supply and demand model; and monetary and fiscal policy issues.

Introduction to Microeconomics (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
Microeconomics is the heart of a wide range of real-world problems in the areas of business, finance, law, and public policy. The purpose of this course is to allow a businessperson to make informed decisions based upon solid theory.

The Mechanical Universe (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
The Mechanical Universe is the first term of an introductory course in physics, which uses advanced computer animation, scientific experiments, and a full array of visual techniques to teach classical mechanics. The course uses creative teaching techniques designed to enhance learning, bringing together original location footage, physics experiments and demonstrations, historical reenactments, and computer animation. In between the professor's lectures lie unusual teaching aids such as hot air balloon events, symphony concerts, bicycle shops, and Coast Guard rescues used to illustrate points made and give the program a modern focus and relevance.

The Mechanical Universe and Beyond (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
This is the second semester of the course in introductory physics for non-science majors, The Mechanical Universe. Instruction builds on the lessons of the first semester and focuses on electricity and magnetism, relativity, waves and optics, heat and thermodynamics, and modern physics. The course employs an array of physical techniques including precision close-up photography of physics experiments, computer animation sequences, and historical reenactments. The Mechanical Universe and Beyond has a text for non-science majors. In between the professor's lectures lie unusual teaching aids such as hot air balloon experiments, symphony concerts, trips to the bicycle shop, and Coast Guard rescues used to illustrate points made and give the program a modern focus and relevance.

Multimedia Literacy (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
Multimedia Literacy defines multimedia, explores its use, and discusses the impact of multimedia's growth on society. The course provides a multimedia toolbox and demonstrates how to create and publish multimedia applications. Topics include multimedia frontiers, emerging technology, and societal issues including human impact, regulation, copyright, fair use, equity, cost, and universal access. Multimedia Literacy combines conceptual and practical components to explore the world of multimedia. The course has two parts: the first part is a conceptual course about multimedia, the second part is a hands-on tutorial. In the conceptual part, students learn how multimedia is changing the world we live in, how to use it effectively, why it become a multibillion-dollar industry so quickly, and the impact it will have on our way of life. In the hands-on component, students learn how to create their own multimedia applications and publish them on the Web.

The Power of Place: Geography for the 21st Century (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
An usual collaboration by an international team of educational broadcasters and geographers from the United States, Australia, France, Japan, the Netherlands, and Sweden, which provides a truly global perspective on the subject of world regional geography. The course provides an examination of many geographic forces currently shaping the complex features of the world's civilizations and environments. The course consists of 26 half-hour video units- organized into 5 Units- which visit 34 countries and over 50 sites around the world.

Renaissance (3 credits, upper division level) December 2003 through 2007
This upper level course brings to life one of the most brilliant and creative periods in history, a time when the modern Western world was born. By using historical re-creations, artwork, and readings by actors, the student will explore the fundamental changes that took place in Europe between the late 14th and late 17th centuries and how the issues raised in this period continue to influence the modern world.

Voices and Visions (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
A course about poetry and the American poetic tradition. Through this course students will learn to "feel" a poem in a way that deepens the pleasure and understanding drawn from both reading and listening to works. The course explore the lives and works of thirteen renowned American poets through interpreted dramatic readings, archival photographs, dance, performances, and interviews. Poets are not represented in chronological order, but in an order that is intended to help students make connections between the authors and their works. The course introduces the poets within their historical and cultural contexts so that students may see the distinctiveness of each as well as the similarities among members of the group. Students are provided with the critical terminology necessary to successfully explore the poet's craft, and will learn to read poetry that speaks with many distinct styles and voices. Students are encouraged to read more poems by these authors and to explore their own feelings and responses to works by other poets.

The Western Tradition, I (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
The first of a two-part survey of Western culture that travels from the ancient world through to the age of technology. Part I begins with the prehistoric world and ends with the Renaissance, offering a broad overview of events that played an important role in shaping the development of Western thought, culture, and tradition as we know them today. The course synthesizes various approaches to the telling of history by focusing on political as well as social events. Integrating such diverse disciplines as religion, demography, government, and economics, it aims to provide a foundation of knowledge, which allows students to better understand the origins of the social, political, and religious institutions of our present day.

The Western Tradition, II (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
The Western Tradition Part II is the second half of a two-part survey of Western culture that travels from the ancient world through to the age of technology. Part II begins with the Reformation in Europe and ends in the 20th century. The course offers a broad overview of events that played an important role in shaping the development of Western thought, culture, and tradition as we know them today. It synthesizes various approaches to the telling of history by focusing on political as well as social events. Integrating such diverse disciplines as religion, demography, government, and economics, it aims to provide a foundation of knowledge, which allows students to better understand the origins of the social, political, and religious institutions of our present day.

The Whole Child: A Caregiver's Guide to the First Five Years (3 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through 2007
The Whole Child focuses on the individual child and how the teacher or caregiver can foster physical, emotional, social, creative, and cognitive development. The course provides students nurturing instruction on the proper care techniques for children from infancy to five years of age; highlights teaching approaches and interactions for children from multicultural backgrounds and at all developmental levels, including those with disabilities and special needs.

Women and Social Action (3 credits, upper division level) December 2003 through 2007
For most women, the struggle for change does not begin in the boardroom or courtroom, but in their home, community, place of worship, school, and workplace. This course helps identify gender stereotypes and barriers and how they impact women's lives. In this course students will explore how gender intersects with other social systems such as age, class, disability, ethnicity, race, religion, and sexual orientation. This course also celebrates women who have made a difference in the battle for social justice.

U.S. History II: From Reconstruction to Modern Day (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through2007
This course immerses students in stories and interpretations of important people, events, and concepts central to understanding the history of the United States. Students come to understand how and why questions that historians ask about the past are shaped by present concerns; learn to search for historically valid explanations of how and why things changed over time; and develop and demonstrate deeper understanding of both past and present.

Understanding Mass Media (3 credits, upper division level) June 2000 through 2007
This course challenges students to think about, discuss, and grapple with issues concerning American Mass Media over the last 50 years. In a series of analytical and interactive classes, students examine the media's impact and perspective on race, gender, and celebrity, as well as examining media's influence on advertising, celebrity politics, campaign reform, and war coverage. With the use of thousands of images and animations, original sound tracks and video footage, students are guided through media issues in America, exploiting the power of the Internet to express their views and thought in an open and engaging forum.

Unseen Life on Earth: An Introduction to Microbiology (3 credits, intermediate division level) December 2003 through 2007
This course explores basic microbial principles and how microorganisms affect everything from medicine to environmental issues to global politics. The course consists of 12 half hour video segments, accompanied by a textbook and a study guide. Visual animations and scanning electron micrographs make complex topics easier to grasp, and case studies from today's headlines, including DNA testing and battles against dangerous viruses, show real-world applications of these concepts. The course provides students a thorough understanding of the five core themes of microbiology, which are: Microbial Cell Biology; Microbial Genetics; Interactions and Impacts of Microorganisms and Humans, Interactions and Impact of Microorganisms in the Environment, and Integrating Themes.