Paralegal Tech Institute (National Paralegal College) Programs

Paralegal Tech Institute (National Paralegal College) Programs

Credits Available with Dates Valid

  • Alternative Dispute Resolution (2 credits, lower division level) September 2004 through September 2012
  • Business Law and Bankruptcy (2 credits, lower division level) January 2004 through September 2012
  • Contracts (2 credits, lower division level) August 2003 through September 2012
  • Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure (2 credits, lower division level) March 2004 through September 2012
  • Criminal Law (2 credits, lower division level) September 2003 through September 2012
  • Domestic Relations (2 credits, lower division level) May 2004 through September 2012
  • Legal Research Writing and Civil Litigation (2 credits, lower division level; note: after October 2007, 2 lower division level credits for this course are recommended as Civil Litigation) April 2004 through September 2012
  • Professional Responsibility and Legal Ethics (2 credits, lower division level) December 2003 through September 2012
  • Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights (2 credits, lower division level) September 2004 through September 2012
  • Real Property (2 credits, lower division level) October 2003 through September 2012
  • Torts and Personal Injury (2 credits, lower division level) June 2003 through September 2012
  • Wills, Trusts and Estates (2 credits, lower division level) March 2004 through September 2012

Source of Records

National Paralegal College; 717 East Maryland Avenue; Phoenix, AZ 85014

About the Training Sponsor

Paralegal Tech Institute has since become National Paralegal College and entered into an articulation agreement with Charter Oak. Students who attended Paralegal Tech Institute programs eligible for credit from this review may request their transcripts from National Paralegal College.

Applying for the Credit

Have National Paralegal College submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

Alternative Dispute Resolution(2 credits, lower division level) September 2004 through September 2012
This course provides students with a working knowledge of the basic theories underlying negotiation, arbitration, and mediation. Students learn the important distinguishing characteristics of each of these "alternative" approaches to resolving disputes, and also learn how to address the ethical and legal issues which may arise in pursuit of these remedies. In addition to covering current theory on these topics, much of the course is dedicated to hypothetical scenarios and court cases concerning arbitration. Another portion centers on the contracts involved in mediation. Thus, students completing this class become familiar with the general workings of these processes both from a theoretical perspective and from a practical perspective.

Business Law and Bankruptcy (2 credits, lower division level) January 2004 through September 2012
This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the principles of the most significant laws pertaining to business organizations. The Business Organization Law component of the course deals with individual characteristics of business organizations, including publicly held and closely held corporations, general partnerships, sole proprietorships, limited liability partnerships, and limited liability corporations. Various forms of business are compared and contrasted to determine advantages and disadvantages of creating and maintaining each form. Students become familiar with the laws governing creation and operation of these various business entities, their dissolutions and liquidations, and their relationships to various categories of creditors and shareholders. The Bankruptcy component of the course acquaints students with the three most common forms of bankruptcy under Chapters 7, 11, and 13 and the U.S. Bankruptcy Code. The course explores the entire spectrum of bankruptcy law, including individual bankruptcies under Chapters 7 and 13, in addition to an overview of the complexities of business bankruptcies under Chapters 7 and 11 of the Bankruptcy Code. Also covered are filing of bankruptcy petitions, motion practice in bankruptcy, the role and power of the bankruptcy trustee, dischargeability of debts, reorganization of business, and the analysis and preparation of Statements and Schedules.

Constitutional Law and Criminal Procedure (2 credits, lower division level) March 2004 through September 2012 This course provides students with a general understanding of the major issues in constitutional law, including the separation of powers between the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the federal government; federalism and states' rights; the concept of interstate commerce; freedom of speech (the First Amendment); substantive and procedural due process; and the equal protection clause; various areas of discrimination. Areas highlighted include: the rights of a criminal defendant; the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches and seizures by police; the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments' guarantees of "due process" for an alleged criminal; the Sixth Amendment's guarantee of the right to counsel along with the landmark case of Miranda v. Arizona; and the Eight Amendment's prohibition of cruel and unusual punishment.

Contracts (2 credits, lower division level) August 2003 through September 2012 This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the commonlaw of contracts, from the formation of a contract through its termination, including the several ways in which a contract can be entered, consideration, offer and acceptance, illusory contracts, oral contracts, the statute of frauds, accord and satisfaction, enforcement, damages for breach of contract, and the several defenses available to a party who rescinds on a contract. Additionally, the course familiarizes students with the Uniform Criminal Code and the laws governing the sale of goods.

Criminal Law (2 credits, lower division level) September 2003 through September 2012
This course is designed to introduce students to the basic concepts of criminal law. The course outlines the definitions and elements of the commonlaw crimes against persons, crimes against property, and the various legal defenses available to criminal defendants. In addition, certain topics in criminal procedure are covered to highlight the constitutional safeguards and procedures involved from arrest through trial.

Domestic Relations (2 credits, lower division level) May 2004 through September 2012 This course surveys various issues pertaining to family law, including the marital relationship, divorce, alimony and other forms of support that can result from divorces, equitable distribution of property, and child custody. The course also focuses on recent decisions and legislation that have profound impact on relatively modern issues and trends, such as legitimacy and status, "palimony", the rights of unmarried parents, "surrogate" parents, and no-fault divorce.

Legal Research Writing and Civil Litigation (2 credits, lower division level; note: after October 2007, 2 lower level credits for this course are recommended as Civil Litigation) April 2004 through September 2012 This course provides students with a comprehensive understanding of the major aspects of civil litigation from both plaintiff's and defendant's perspectives. Students learn how to manage a case from beginning to end, including: determining jurisdiction and venue; initiating and commencing a lawsuit; client counseling; investigation techniques and the discovery process; drafting summons and complaints, motions, briefs, and pleadings; settlement techniques; the trial itself; pre- and post-trial activities, and the appeals process. The course offers an intensive but simplified introduction to U.S. legal systems and methodologies, principles of stare decisis and precedent, the nature of legal education, and sources of law. Topics include: federal and state judicial structure; statutes, regulations, common and constitutional law; synthesizing sources of law; overruling precedent, holding, rationale, and dictum. The course also focuses on training students to do competent legal research and developing their ability to draft legal documents. Students learn to use a variety of research tools, including online and book-based methods; proper case citation; citation checking and the proper method of case reporting; shepardizing methods of compiling legislative histories; and administrative legal research.

Professional Responsibility and Legal Ethics (2 credits, lower level); December 2003-September 2012 This course covers basic principles governing the ethical practice of law for both lawyers and paralegals. In addition, it provides students with the necessary tools for identifying and resolving ethical problems, and gives practical tips to use in everyday practice. Areas covered include the regulation of attorney and paralegal conduct, confidentiality, the unauthorized practice of law, conflicts of interest, the handling of client funds, advertising, billing, fee splitting, disciplinary procedures, and malpractice. Although the course provides students with an understanding of the universal concepts of professional responsibility, each jurisdiction has its own minor variations on these concepts, and students are encouraged to explore their local rules of professional conduct.

Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights (2 credits, lower division level) September 2004 through September 2012 This course is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the various types of intellectual property, namely: Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights. Specifically, this course covers the basic requirements for protecting each type of intangible, highlights the sources of authority that govern intellectual property law, explains what types of rights are available, introduces what constitutes infringement, discusses the defenses available for infringement, and lists the types of remedies used to compensate an owner for infringement. Given the production and export from foreign countries of products that violate U.S. patents, trademarks, and copyrights, the course also presents a comparison of protection methods available abroad.

Real Property (2 credits, lower division level) October 2003 through September 2012
This course provides students with a fundamental understanding of the concepts and working terminology of real property law. The course reviews disclosure obligations and regulations affecting brokers, sales people and owners. It provides an introduction to buying, selling, leasing, and investing in real estate; a brief look at the general laws of land ownership and transactions, including rights and interests in land, forms of ownership, and methods of title transfer; title examinations and insurance; parties to a real estate transaction; sales agreements and contracts; real estate financing including appraisals and mortgages; the owner-broker relationship; deeds and indentures; real property descriptions; the closing and settlement process; and post-settlement activities. This course will further acquaint our students with the process of a real estate transaction and the documentation involved.

Torts and Personal Injury (2 credits, lower division level) June 2003 through September 2012
This course provides students with a general understanding of the laws dealing with civil wrongs and the remedies for those wrongs, including intentional torts, negligence, liability of principles for the actions of their agents, strict liability, products liability, nuisance, defamation, invasion of privacy, and various factors that affect the right of a plaintiff to bring suit against a defendant. The course also focuses on the nature of a personal injury litigation, its documentation and practices, assessing and evaluating claims of damages, losses, and the formalities of adjudication and/or settlement.

Wills, Trusts and Estates (2 credits, lower division level) March 2004 through September 2012
This course provides students with a practical understanding of the laws of estate planning. Students learn how the federal estate tax system works and what to consider when doing estate planning. Topics include: federal estate and gift taxation; various estate planning techniques; proper use of trusts; life insurance as an estate planning tool; gifts; charitable transfers; intro family business and property transfers; and planning for incapacity. Students learn procedures relevant to drafting and interpreting will and trust documents, and become familiar with the initial planning and preparation necessary for a comprehensive estate plan. Also discussed as techniques for drafting estate planning documents, estate administration, probate practice, the closing of an estate, relevant gift tax laws, the role of the probate courts in estate planning, and basic inheritance issues.