New England International School of Ministry (formerly First Baptist School of Ministry) Programs

New England International School of Ministry (formerly First Baptist School of Ministry) Programs

Credits Available with Dates Valid

  • African American Religion (formerly History of the Black Church); (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
  • History of Christianity to the Reformation (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
  • History of Christianity II (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
  • History of the English Bible Translations (1 credit, lower division level, in Religious Studies) 1991 through 2001
  • Homiletics (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
  • World Religions (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001

Source of Records

New England International School of Ministry; 1151 Blue Hills Avenue; Bloomfield, CT 06002

About the Training Sponsor

The First Baptist School of Ministry, established by the First Baptist Church in 1981, provides post-secondary religious and theological education for adults in the Greater Hartford region. The curriculum provides students with "the knowledge necessary for a working faith, creating a balance of faith and works", and includes courses in Bible, theology, Church history, preaching, worship, Christian education, and spirituality.

Applying for the Credit

Have your training sponsor submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

African American Religion (formerly History of the Black Church); (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
To examine the history, leadership, dynamics, theology, and cultural milieu of African-American religion. Beginning with consideration of the religious life and traditions of African-American slaves, the course traces the evolution of independent black churches, the rise of black sects and cults, the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, and the emergence of contemporary expressions of Black Theology and Ethics.

History of Christianity to the Reformation (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
To provide an introduction to the develop of the Christian Church's doctrine, faith and practice from its founding to the time of the Protestant Reformation. Topics include the birth of the Church, the Church in Jerusalem, the young Church in action, the formation of the Biblical Canon, the Age of Constantine, the development of Christian doctrine, medieval Christianity, St. Augustine, the monastic movement, the Renaissance and Europe on the eve of the Reformation.

History of Christianity II (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
To provide a world prospective of the expansion of Christianity. Topics include Martin Luther and the origins of Protestantism, the expansion of Christianity in Great Britain, Europe, Latin America, Asia, Africa, and North America.

History of the English Bible Translations (1 credit, lower division level, in Religious Studies) 1991 through 2001
To trace the history of the English Bible translations from 1000 A.D. to the present. Topics include the original Bible languages, the Golden Age, the Middle Ages and Reformation, the American Standard Version, and the flood of new translations since 1946.

Homiletics (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
To instruct on the basic methods and techniques of preparing and delivering a sermon. The course explores the history and structural development of the sermon. Topics include development of relevant themes, interpreting text, designing the structure, delivery and critique. Students prepare sermon outlines and deliver one fifteen-minute sermon.

World Religions (3 credits, lower division level, in Religious Studies) Fall 1991 through 2001
To identify the key elements of each of the major religions (Ogala, Judaism, Islam, Christianity, Hinduism, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism); the stages of religious growth; the relationship between culture and religion; the relationship between religion, God, and human activity; to recognize critical methods of studying a religion; and to distinguish the key elements in identifying religious phenomena. The course investigates the essence of religion, the variety of religious phenomena and systems and various approaches to the study of religion.