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ECE 205: Diversity and Ethics in Early Childhood Education

Course Description

This course is designed for students who work or are preparing to work in early childhood education.  Students taking this course will develop an historical and contemporary understanding of diversity and anti-bias teaching practices focusing on the United States. Participants will examine the meaning of culture, race, ethnicity, language, gender, families and how those concepts influence identity and school experience. Students will review the NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct and consider strategies for affirming diversity in the early childhood classroom.  (3 credits)

Prerequisite

  • ECE 101: Introduction to Early Childhood Education

Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

At the Associate of Science level, students will: 
  1. Promote Child Development and Learning- understand how young children develop and learn and how to use developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments inclusive of all young children (NAEYC, Standard 1).
  2. Establish Family and Community Relationships- understand and support diverse family and community characteristics and engage with families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships (NAEYC, Standard 2).
  3. Observe, document and Assess- utilize a variety of assessment tools to observe and document development and to plan for future instruction respective of each child’s developmental needs (NAEYC, Standard 3).
  4. Utilize Developmentally Effective Approaches- develop positive relationships and supportive interactions with young children and using effective strategies and tools for teaching and learning in early education, (NAEYC, Standard 4). NAEYC, Standard 3).
  5. Use Content Knowledge to build Meaningful Curriculum- develop experiences within environments that are safe, healthy, inclusionary and culturally pluralistic and reflect understanding of developmentally appropriate practices, (NAEYC, Standard 5).
  6. Develop as a Professional- engage in continuous reflective and collaborative learning and identify oneself as an emerging professional within the early childhood field (NAEYC, Standard 6). 7.
  7. Engage in Field Experiences to support learning with various age groups and across multiple early childhood settings (NAEYC, Standard 7).
 
At the Bachelor of Science level, in addition to the above, students will: 
  1. Promote Child Development and Learning- have a deeper understanding of child development and be able to use both developmental knowledge as well as early childhood research to create healthy, respectful, supportive and challenging learning environments for inclusive of all young children (NAEYC, Standard 1).
  2. Establish Family and Community Relationships- understand and support diverse family and community characteristics and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships in young children’s development and learning (NAEYC, Standard 2).
  3. Observe, document and Assess- support young children’s development and learning and effectively be able to administer and interpret assessments for young children with special needs, provide interventions and make referrals when appropriate (NAEYC, Standard 3).
  4. Utilize Developmentally Effective Approaches- develop experiences within environments that are safe, healthy, inclusionary and culturally pluralistic and reflect understanding of developmentally appropriate practices for each child, (NAEYC, Standard 5).
  5. Use Content Knowledge to build Meaningful Curriculum- demonstrate advanced content knowledge related to the academic disciplines, central concepts and inquiry in teaching, and appropriate early learning standards and other resources to design, implement and evaluate developmentally appropriate meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child (NAEYC, Standard 5). 
  6. Develop as a Professional- engage in continuous reflective and collaborative learning and identify oneself as a professional within the early childhood field by mentoring others (NAEYC, Standard 6).

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Recognize that diversity is a trait of culture in the United States.
  2. Explain the historical sources of diversity in the United States.

  3. Describe major historical points of immigration into the United States and contemporary issues related to immigration.

  4. Survey characteristics of major cultural groups and compare similarities and differences with mainstream culture.

  5. Explain how culture shapes identity.

  6. Define culture within the context of core elements across various cultures and as it creates diversity.
  7. Analyze the impact of stereotypes and discrimination on culturally diverse groups.

  8. Investigate the importance of race and ethnicity in the context of culture.

  9. Recognize the family as the means of cultural transmission.
  10. Compare child rearing practices across cultural groups.

  11. Explain family organization in contemporary society as it reflects societal change.

  12. Identify the primary factors that influence the development of identity, specifically in young children.

  13. Describe historical efforts addressing equality and social justice for children and the influence of these events on the emergence of multicultural education.

  14. Describe two models of multicultural education.
  15. Describe three early childhood multicultural approaches to curriculum.

  16. Describe curriculum development that is responsive to a diverse learning environment.

  17. Analyze the meaning of linguistic diversity and how to integrate dual language learners into the classroom.

  18. Demonstrate the key components of a multicultural classroom environment.
  19. Discuss the importance of family, school, and community as collaborative partners.
  20. Describe the importance of an anti-bias curriculum and demonstrate appropriate activities.

General Education Outcomes (GEOs)

Please check the applicable GEOs for this course, if any, by outcomes at GEO Category Search, or by subject area at GEO Discipline Search.

Course Activities and Grading

Assignments

Weight

Discussions and Week 4 Blog (Weeks 1-8)

15%

Written Assignments (Weeks1-7)

10%

Multicultural Autobiography (Weeks 2 and 6)

15%

Midterm Exam (Week 4)

10%

Projects: Observation/Interview & Getting Out of Your Comfort Zone (Weeks 3 or 4, 5)

20%

Reflective Journal (Weeks 1-8)

15%

Final Exam (Week 8)

15%

Total

100%

 

Required Textbooks

Available through Charter Oak's online bookstore

  • Derman-Sparks, L. & Edwards, J.O. (2010). Anti-Bias Education for Young Children and Ourselves. Washington, D.C.: National Association for the Education of Young Children.

    ISBN-13: 978-1-928896-67-8

  • Feeney, S. & Freeman, N.K. (2018).  Ethics and the Early Childhood Educator: using the NAEYC Code, 3rd ed. Washington, D.C.: National Association for Young Children. ISBN-13: 978-1-938113-33-8

  • Robles de Melendez, W. & Beck, V. (2019). Teaching Young Children in Multicultural Classrooms: Issues, Concepts, and Strategies. Boston: Cengage. ISBN-13: 978-1-337-56607-0

 

Additional Resources

  • National Association for the Education of Young Children
  • McIntosh, P. (1992). "White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.” In Filor, A.M. Compliation. Multiculturalism, 1992. New York State Council of Educational Associations. October: 30-37. (Available through Charter Oak's Virtual Library)

 

Course Schedule

Week

PLOs

SLOs

Readings and Exercises

Assignments

1

1,6

1,2,3,4,7,20

Topic: Foundations: Living in Diversity

  • Readings:
    • NAEYC Code of Ethical Conduct and Statement of Commitment, Feeney, pp.127-134; and chapters 1 through 3
    • Read Robles de Melendez & Beck (R&B) Chapter 1
    • Read Derman-Sparks & Edwards (D-S E) Chapter 1
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #1
  • Assignment: R&B. Making Connections, p. 28, #1
  • BEGIN (Multi)cultural Autobiography - first draft due Week 2; final draft due Week 6
  • BEGIN Project – “Let’s Read Some Books”

2

1,3,4,7

 5,6,8-12

Topic: Foundations: Culture and Families

  • Readings:
    • R&B Chapters 2, 3
    • D-SE Chapter 2, 9, 11
    • Watch TedTalk – The Danger of a Single Story
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Watch video
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #2
  • DUE:first draft - multicultural autobiography
  • Schedule an observation (to be done in either week 3 or week 4) for Project – Classroom Observation/Interview – “Looking for Diversity”
  • Assignment: R&B. Making Connections, p. 84, #3

3

 1,3,4,7

12,13,20

Topics: Foundations: Child Development and Identity Fairness

  • Readings:
    • R&B - Chapter 4
    • D-SE - Chapters 6 and 7
    • Feeney - Chapters 4, 5
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Project observation: “Classroom Observation/Teacher Interview – Looking for Diversity” May be completed this week OR WEEK 4
  • Submit reflective journal #3
  • BEGIN: Getting Out of the Comfort Zone
  • Assignment: What is it like for you...
 4 3,5,6,7

20

Topic: Becoming an Anti-bias Teacher

  • Readings:
    • D-SE - Chapter 3 and Chapter 4 - pp. 32-42 and top half of p. 43
    • McIntosh, P. (1992). “White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack.”
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #4
  • Project observation: “Classroom Observation/Teacher Interview – Looking for Diversity” IF NOT DONE IN WEEK 3
  • DUE: Project – “Classroom Observation/Interview – Looking for Diversity”
  • Assignment: Where is the Power?
  • Take the Midterm Exam
Midterm Exam

D-SE Chapters 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 9 and pp. 32 through 42

SLOs 1-13 and 20

5

 3,4,6,7

14,15

Topics: Exploring the Roots of Multicultural Education and Frameworks to Action

  • Readings:
    • R&B - Chapters 5 and 6
    • Feeney - Chapter 6
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #5
  • DUE: Project - “Getting Out of the Comfort Zone”
  • Assignment: R&B. p. 138, Making Connections, #1
  • Assignment: R&B. Making Connections, p. 170, #1, #5, #6

6

 1-5,7

16,17,18,20

Topics: Classrooms, Where Words Become Actions and Language Diversity

  • Readings:
    • R&B - Chapters 7, 8 (through section 8-4d)
    • D-SE  Chapters 5 and10
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #6
  • DUE:final draft – multicultural autobiography
  • Assignment: Connections and Challenges with Languages

7

 1-7

16,17,18,19,20

Topics: Language Diversity (continued) & Activities and Resources

  • Readings:
    • R&B - finish Chapters 8 and 9
    • D-SE - Chapter 4 - pp. 43-51

 

  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #7
  • Assignment: R&B. Making Connections, p. 261, #1
 8 2,7

17,18,18,20

Topics: Activities and Resources (continued) and Collaboration       

  • Readings:
    • R&B - Chapter 10
    • Feeney - chapters 7, 8                                   
  • Read assigned chapter
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Submit reflective journal #8
  • Complete Final Exam
  • Due: "Let's Read Some Books"
Final Exam

R&B Chapters 5, 6, 7 and 8

D-SE Chapters 4, 5 and 10

SLOs 14-20

COSC Accessibility Statement

Charter Oak State College encourages students with disabilities, including non-visible disabilities such as chronic diseases, learning disabilities, head injury, attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, or psychiatric disabilities, to discuss appropriate accommodations with the Office of Accessibility Services at OAS@charteroak.edu.

COSC Policies, Course Policies, Academic Support Services and Resources

Students are responsible for knowing all Charter Oak State College (COSC) institutional policies, course-specific policies, procedures, and available academic support services and resources. Please see COSC Policies for COSC institutional policies, and see also specific policies related to this course. See COSC Resources for information regarding available academic support services and resources.