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OEL 655: Role of Nonprofit in Fostering Social Change (Graduate Level)

Course Description

This course focuses on the impact of nonprofit organization in fostering social change and the roles of the director and board in bringing about social change. The course will challenge students to consider the shift from a program centric model to a mission centric approach that is focused on social impact, outcomes, and measures of success. Students will also gain an understanding of the roles and influences (positive and negative) of philanthropy on political advocacy and social change movements in the U.S.; the scope and diversity of the philanthropic sector; political advocacy approaches and social movements; and examples of current philanthropic involvement in advocacy and social change efforts across the political spectrum. It will examine nonprofit organizations that have succeeded and those that have failed in implementing social change. (3 credits)

Prerequisite

  • OEL 501: Learning Community

Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Students who successfully complete this course will be able to:

  1. Describe various theories, concepts and models associated with organizational change processes to apply to an organizational dilemma.
  2. Evaluate the importance of organizational change and illustrate the role that learning plays in an organizational change process.
  3. Explain the effects of philanthropy on social movements and political change.
  4. Compare the program centric model to the mission centric model, including advantages and disadvantages as it relates to fostering social change.
  5. Formulate a solid assessment of a nonprofit's capacity to engage in advocacy and social change.
  6. Explain how to engage key constituencies including staff, board and volunteers in bringing about change.
  7. Explain the intersection of philanthropy with policy, business, law and society.
  8. Develop a strategic plan for a nonprofit that will foster social change, including outcomes assessment.
  9. Demonstrate use of metrics in performance and program evaluation.

     

Applicable Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)

4. Recommend how one develops effective groups.
5. Construct organizational leadership strategies.
7. Design and implement organizational change processes.
11. Formulate change strategies that supports a continual changing landscape for nonprofit organizations.
13. Conduct research utilizing online sources and databases and write research papers that analyze and synthesize information and data gathered.

 

Course Activities and Grading

Assignments

Points

Discussions (10 Discussion Questions at 20 points each)

200

Research Papers (4 at 100 points each)

400

Application Papers (2 at 200 points each)

400

Total Points

1,000

Required Textbooks

(Available through our https://bookstore.mbsdirect.net/vbm/vb_home.php?FVCUSNO=35478)

  • Faber, D. R. and D. McCarthy. Foundations for Social Change: Critical Perspectives on Philanthropy Popular Movements. Rowman & Littlefield, Inc., 2005. ISBN-13: 9780742549883

Supplemental Required Readings/Resources

  • Links to the supplemental readings and articles are provided in the course shells.

Course Schedule

Week

PLOs

SLOs

Readings and Exercises

Assignments

1

4,5,13

3,4,5,6

An introduction to change

  1. Introduction (pp. 3-32), Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Ashe-Eric Higher Education Report. (2001). Theories and models of organizational change.  Understanding and Facilitating Organizational Change in the 21st Century, 28:4, 25-54.
  3. Crutchfield, L. (2018). Social change requires a strong grass roots, not just money. Chronicle of Philanthropy, 30(6), 34-37.
  4. Evans, S. D., & Kivell, N. (2015). The transformation team: An enabling structure for organizational learning in action. Journal of Community Psychology, 43(6), 760-777. doi:10.1002/jcop.21756
  5. Greenaway, K. H., Cichocka, A., Veelen, R., Likki, T., & Branscombe, N. R. (2016). Feeling hopeful inspires support for social change. Political Psychology, 37(1), 89-107. doi:10.1111/pops.12225
     6. Yorks, L., & Barto, J. (2015). Workplace, organizational, and societal: Three domains of learning for 21st-century cities. New Directions for Adult & Continuing Education, 2015(145), 35-44. doi:10.1002/ace.20121
  • Read assigned articles
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Research Paper

2

4,5,7,11,13

3,4,5,6,8

The Role of Nonprofits: Advocacy, Policy Development, and Change

  1. Chapter 5, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Child, C. D., & Grønbjerg, K. A. (2007). Nonprofit advocacy organizations: Their characteristics and activities. Social Science Quarterly (Wiley-Blackwell), 88(1), 259-281. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6237.2007.00457.x
  3. Smith, S. R. (2001). Nonprofit organizations in urban politics and policy. Policy Studies Review, 18(4), 7.

     4. Smith, S. R. (2003). Government and nonprofits in the modern age. Society, 40(4), 36-45.

  1. Vaughan, S. K., & Arsneault, S. (2008). Not-for-profit advocacy: Challenging policy images and pursuing policy change. Review of Policy Research, 25(5), 411-428. doi:10.1111/j.1541-1338.2008.00344.x
    6.     Yoshioka, T. (2014). Representational roles of nonprofit advocacy organizations in the United States. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, 25(4), 1062-1090. doi:10.1007/s11266-013-9385-2

  • Read assigned articles
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Research Paper

3

4,5,7,11,13

1,2,3,4,5,6,7

Diversity and Change

  1. Chapter 7, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Dovidio, J. F., Saguy, T., & Gaertner, S. L. (2010). Appreciating the role of the “individual mind” in diversity science: Commonality, harmony, and social change. Psychological Inquiry, 21(2), 108-114. doi:10.1080/1047840X.2010.486071
  3. Hurd, K., & Plaut, V. C. (2018). Diversity entitlement: Does diversity-benefits ideology undermine inclusion? Northwestern University Law Review, 112(6), 1605-1635.
  4. Pasek, M. H., Filip‐Crawford, G., & Cook, J. E. (2017). Identity concealment and social change: Balancing advocacy goals against individual needs. Journal of Social Issues, 73(2), 397-412. doi:10.1111/josi.12223
  5. Ramos, M. R., Hewstone, M., Barreto, M., & Branscombe, N. R. (2016). The opportunities and challenges of diversity: Explaining its impact on individuals and groups. European Journal of Social Psychology, 46(7), 793-806. doi:10.1002/ejsp.2261
  6. Reinheimer, J. (2008). What Lawrence should have said: Reconstructing an equality approach. California Law Review, 96(2), 505-551.
    7. Ryzhova, S. V. (2017). Trust and ethnic tolerance in the face of social change. Sociological Research, 56(3), 197-217. doi:10.1080/10610154.2017.1379252
  • Read assigned articles
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material

4

4,5,7,11,13

1-9

The Influence of Philanthropy on Political Advocacy Approaches and Social Movements

  1. Chapter 6, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Andrews, K. T., & Edwards, B. (2004). Advocacy organizations in the U.S. political process. Annual Review of Sociology, 30479-506. doi:10.1146/annurev.soc.30.012703.110542
  3. Buffardi, A., Pekkanen, R., & Smith, S. (2017). Proactive or protective? Dimensions of and advocacy activities associated with reported policy change by nonprofit organizations. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, 28(3), 1226-1248. doi:10.1007/s11266-017-9849-x
  4. Fyall, R. (2017). Nonprofits as advocates and providers: A conceptual framework. Policy Studies Journal, 45(1), 121-143. doi:10.1111/psj.12165
  5. Harrison, J. L. (2016). Bureaucrats' tacit understandings and social movement policy implementation: Unpacking the deviation of agency environmental justice programs from EJ movement priorities. Social Security Bulletin, 76(4), 534-553. doi:10.1093/socpro/spw024
    6.  Schmidt, C. W. (2016). Legal history and the problem of the long civil rights movement. Law & Social Inquiry, 41(4), 1081-1107. doi:10.1111/lsi.12245
  • Read assigned articles
  • Participate in the Discussion
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Application Paper

5

4,5,7,11,13

1-9

The Intersection of Philanthropy, Business, Government, and Society

  1. Chapter 1, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Bishop, M., & Green, M. (2015). Philanthrocapitalism rising. Society, 52(6), 541-548. doi:10.1007/s12115-015-9945-8
  3. Jenkins, G. W. (2011). Who's afraid of philanthrocapitalism? Case Western Reserve Law Review, 61(3), 753-821.
  4. Mitchell, K., & Sparke, M. (2016). The new Washington consensus: Millennial philanthropy and the making of global market subjects. Antipode, 48(3), 724-749. doi:10.1111/anti.12203
  5. Olmedo, A. (2017). Something old, not much new, and a lot borrowed: Philanthropy, business, and the changing roles of government in global education policy networks. Oxford Review of Education, 43(1), 69-87. doi:10.1080/03054985.2016.1259104
    6.  Parthasarathy, H., & Fishburne, L. (2015).Philanthropy's role in translating scientific innovation. Nature Biotechnology, 33(10), 1022-1025. doi:10.1038/nbt.3369
  • Read assigned articles and chapters
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Research Project

6

4,5,7,11,13

1-9

The Influence of Foundations on Policy Development

  1. Chapter 4, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Bushouse, B. K. (2017). Leveraging nonprofit and voluntary action research to inform public policy. Policy Studies Journal, 45(1), 50-73. doi:10.1111/psj.12195
  3. Callahan, D. (2017). Second thoughts: Why I changed my mind about philanthropy and public policy. Inside Philanthropy. Retrieved from https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2017/5/3/philanthropy-and-public-policy
  4. Ealy, L. (2014). The Intellectual Crisis in Philanthropy. Society, 51(1), 87-96. doi:10.1007/s12115-013-9741-2
  5. Micinski, N. (2017). The changing role of the Ford Foundation in international development, 1951-2001. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, 28(3), 1301-1325. doi:10.1007/s11266-017-9850-4
  6. Open Secrets. (n.d.). Political nonprofits: Top election spenders. Retrieved from https://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/nonprof_elec.php
     7. Wyszomirski, M. J. (2013). Shaping a triple-bottom line for nonprofit arts organizations: Micro-, macro-, and meta-policy influences. Cultural Trends, 22(3/4), 156-166. doi:10.1080/09548963.2013.817645
  • Read assigned chapters
  • Participate in the Discussion
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Research Paper

7

4,5,7,11,13

1-9

Nonprofit Collaboration and Partnerships

  1. Chapter 8, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Bradach, J. L., Tierney, T. J., Stone, N. (2008). Delivering on the promise of nonprofits. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2008/12/delivering-on-the-promise-of-nonprofits
  3. Bryson, J. M., Patton, M. Q., & Bowman R. M. (2011). Working with evaluation stakeholder: A rationale, step-wise approach and toolkit. Evaluation and Program Planning, 34, 1-12.
  4. Canada, G. (2013) Our failing schools. Enough is enough!” TED Talks. Retrieved from http://www.ted.com/talks/geoffrey_canada_our_failing_schools_enough_is_enough?language=en
  5. Christensen, C. M., Baumann, H., Ruggles, R., Sadtlet, T. M. (2006). Disruptive innovation for social change. Harvard Business Review. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2006/12/disruptive-innovation-for-social-change
    6.  Kohl-Arenas, E. (2014). Will the revolution be funded? Resource mobilization and the California farm worker movement. Social Movement Studies, 13(4), 482-498. doi:10.1080/14742837.2013.863727
  • Read assigned article and chapters
  • Participate in the Discussion
  • Review the Lecture material

8

4,5,7,11,13

1-9

Integration of Major Concepts and Conclusions

  1. Chapter 10, Faber, D. R., & McCarthy, D. (2005). Foundations for social change: Critical perspectives on philanthropy and popular movements. Oxford, England: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  2. Andersson, F. O. (2011). Finding new ways to understand and teach entrepreneurship in the nonprofit sector: Introducing the nonprofit entrepreneurship tree. The Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, 1(2). Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.cosc.idm.oclc.org/docview/1730195778?accountid=26762
  3. Flanigan, S. (2017). Crowdfunding and diaspora philanthropy: An integration of the literature and major concepts. Voluntas: International Journal of Voluntary & Nonprofit Organizations, 28(2), 492-509. doi:10.1007/s11266-016-9755-7
  4. Salamon, L. M., & Anheier, H. K. (1997). The civil society sector. Society, 34(2), 60-65.
  5. Smith, C., Whitford, A., & Schlager, E. (2017). Moving beyond the boundaries? Exploring nexus among public policy, public management, and nonprofit and voluntary studies fields. Policy Studies Journal, 45(1), 4-21. doi:10.1111/psj.12196
     6. Young, D. R., & Kim, C. (2015). Can social enterprises remain sustainable and mission-focused? applying resiliency theory. Social Enterprise Journal, 11(3), 233-259. Retrieved from https://search-proquest-com.cosc.idm.oclc.org/docview/1732340228?accountid=26762
  • Read assigned projects
  • Participate in the Discussions
  • Review the Lecture material
  • Complete the Application Paper
  • Complete Course Evaluation

COSC Accessibility Statement

Charter Oak State College encourages students with disabilities, including non-visible disabilities such as chronic diseases, learning disabilities, head injury, attention deficit/hyperactive disorder, or psychiatric disabilities, to discuss appropriate accommodations with the Office of Accessibility Services at OAS@charteroak.edu.

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Students are responsible for knowing all Charter Oak State College (COSC) institutional policies, course-specific policies, procedures, and available academic support services and resources. Please see COSC Policies for COSC institutional policies, and see also specific policies related to this course. See COSC Resources for information regarding available academic support services and resources.