Capital Region Education Council (CREC) Programs

Capital Region Education Council (CREC) Programs

Programs Reviewed

  • Paraprofessional Training Program
  • Second Helping Program
  • Speech and Language Pathology Assistant Training Program
  • Urban Parents as Paraprofessionals Program

Credits Available with Dates Valid

Paraprofessional Training Program
  • Autistic Learner and Assistive Technology (3 credits, lower division level) March 2007 through May 2014
  • Behavior Strategies (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
  • Exceptional Learners (3 credits, basic division level) January 2002 through May 2014
  • Introduction to Paraprofessional Training (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
  • Paraprofessional Internship (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
Second Helping Program

The available credit applies only to individuals who took the five-module program and satisfactorily completed the assigned work or to earlier graduates who returned to the program to complete additional work.

  • Family Child Care Principles and Practices (3 credits, lower division level) March 1993 through March 1999
Speech and Language Pathology Assistant Training Program
  • Introduction to Language and Communication Development (3 credits, lower division level) September 2007 through December 2014
  • Language and Communication Development in Autism (3 credits, upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
  • Language Disorders and Interventions (3 credits, upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
  • Language and Literacy Development (3 credits, upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
  • Speech Disorders and Interventions (3 credits, lower division level) May 2008 through December 2014
  • Speech and Language Pathology Assistant Practicum (3 credits, upper division level) January 2009 through December 2014
  • Speech and Language Services in the School Setting (3 credits, lower division level) January 2008 through December 2014
Urban Parents as Paraprofessionals

From July 1994 through 1996, CREC offered the Urban Parents as Paraprofessionals Training Program to parents who wished to improve parenting skills and to become eligible for employment in human services agencies.

  • Direct Care Training
    • Basic Communication Skills (2 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
    • Introduction to Basic Health Care (3 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
    • Introduction to Child Development (2 credits, lower division level; July 1994 through July 1996
    • Professional Development in Human Services (2 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996

Source of Records

Capital Region Education Council; 111 Charter Oak Avenue; Hartford, CT 06106

About the Training Sponsor

The Capitol Region Education Council (CREC) is one of the six educational service centers in Connecticut. A full range of educational programs, from early childhood through adult education, are operated by CREC. CREC operates seven magnet schools, an advanced alternative route to certification for special education cross endorsement, and paraprofessional training programs. CREC provides training and educational programs to staff in public and private schools and agencies in Connecticut and neighboring states.

Applying for the Credit

Have your training sponsor submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

Paraprofessional Training Program

Autistic Learner and Assistive Technology (3 credits, lower division level) March 2007 through May 2014
This course provides student with specific academic and behavioral strategies to assist students with autism. Students also learn the uses of Assistive Technology to support independent learning. Visits to classrooms and AT resource centers along with reflective journal and case study assignments allow students to observe and experience content knowledge within educational settings. Learning outcomes are based on the National Paraprofessional standards.

Behavior Strategies (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
This course provides students with specific strategies to prevent and manage challenging student behaviors. Learning outcomes are based on the National Paraprofessional standards, Levels 1-3.

Exceptional Learners (3 credits, lower division level) January 2002 through May 2014
This course provides students with information on 10 disability categories that are protected under a federal law, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Characteristics of each disability category and specific academic and behavioral strategies to assist students with disabilities and reviewed and discussed. Students visit classrooms to lean and experience about various disability categories. Reflective journal and case study assignments allow students to observe and experience content knowledge within educational settings. Learning outcomes are based on Levels 1, 2 and 3 of the National Paraprofessional standards.

Introduction to Paraprofessional Training (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
This course provides students with an overview of the roles and responsibilities of the educational paraprofessional. Learning outcomes are based on levels one and two of the National Paraprofessional standards, and include information on behavior techniques, communication, legal issues, instructional strategies, and roles and responsibilities. Students are provided with numerous modes of learning, including lecture, group discussion, activities and classroom observations to assist them in learning and demonstrating the content of Introduction to Paraprofessional.

Paraprofessional Internship (3 credits, lower division level) January 2003 through May 2014
This course provides students with a classroom internship to apply skills learned in Introduction to Paraprofessional Standards, levels 1-3. Student interns have an opportunity to work as a paraprofessional intern in an educational setting for 120 hours. CREC faculty and the supervising teacher observe and meet regularly with the intern.

Second Helping Program

Family Child Care Principles and Practices (3 credits, lower division level) March 1993 through March 1999
To develop the family day care provider's self-esteem and interpersonal communication and conflict resolution skills; to increase the family day care provider's knowledge regarding effective business and management practices, child development and developmentally appropriate practice, and family diversity and healthy family traits; to develop the family child care provider's observation techniques and skills in the selection of developmentally appropriate activities; and to develop a sense of professionalism in the family child provider.

Speech and Language Pathology Assistant Training Program

Introduction to Language and Communication Development (3 credits, lower division level) September 2007 through December 2014
This course provides students with an overview of the normal process of language and communication development and its relationship to social, physical, psychological and cognitive development, including the components of phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics will be presented.

Language and Communication Development in Autism (3 credits. upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
This course provides students with an overview of the nature and complexities of Autism Spectrum Disorder and its characteristics including the core skills necessary for social, communication and literacy development. Students will examine evidence-based interventions for this population and will create a variety of support tools proven effective for individuals with autism.

Language Disorders and Interventions (3 credits, upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
This course provides a general overview of the language disorders and hearing disorders in preschool and school age children and their subsequent evidence-based interventions. This course will also examine the link that language disorders and hearing disorders have to literacy development. Conditions requiring augmentative and alternative communication will be covered as well as multicultural differences in language development. This course will prepare Speech Language Pathology Assistants for their role in providing services to children with language impairments, hearing impairments, and to children who use augmentative and alternative communication devices and or systems.

Language and Literacy Development (3 credits, upper division level) July 2008 through December 2014
This course explores the components of literacy development and the significant role speech and language plays within this development. Students will examine characteristics of delayed and disordered literacy development and their link to speech and language development. Students will be exposed to evidence based intervention methods for delayed and disordered development and the role of the speech language assistant within the intervention process.

Speech Disorders and Interventions (3 credits, lower division level) May 2008 through December 2014
This course provides a general overview of the anatomy and physiology of the speech production mechanism; speech delays and disorders covered include phonology, voice, fluency, feeding and swallowing disorders in preschool and school aged children. Students will be taught specialized instruction and evidence-based interventions used for remediation and or compensatory strategies. This course will be preparing Speech/Language Pathology Assistants for their role in providing assistance to children with these disorders in educational settings.

Speech and Language Pathology Assistant Practicum (3 credits, upper division level) January 2009 through December 2014
This course facilitates student application of supervised clinical practice procedures as required of an speech and language pathology assistant in an education setting. This practicum course is designed to provide supervised learning experiences and application opportunities of foundation skills essential to working effectively as a speech and language pathology assistant. Students are expected to demonstrate Speech Language Pathology Assistant Competencies under the graduated guidance of the course instructor and site Speech Language Pathologist Supervisor. Students examine theoretical concepts, and reflect on and analyze their practicum experiences in-class as they continue to examine their role as speech language services in the school setting.

Speech and Language Services in the School Setting (3 credits, lower division level) January 2008 through December 2014
This course addresses professional issues related to the role of the Speech Language Pathology Assistant in the practice of Speech/language pathology in the school setting. Topics will include but are not limited to, the legal and policy framework for school services, ethical practice, supervision, collaboration, scheduling, data collection, advocating, professional development, resources, and professional trends. This course includes an observation component.

Urban Parents as Paraprofessionals Program

Direct Care Training
Basic Communication Skills (2 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
Introduction to Basic Health Care (3 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
Introduction to Child Development (2 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
Professional Development in Human Services (2 credits, lower division level) July 1994 through July 1996
The program prepares graduates with knowledge and skills required by entry level direct care workers who assist in providing care for persons with disabilities in group homes, employment programs, day activity/community experience programs and schools. Graduates will be able to identify the roles and responsibilities of direct care workers, demonstrate acceptable interpersonal communication skills, identify the elements and demonstrate the skills of objective observation and the protocols for reporting, describe the developmental characteristics of children from birth to age eighteen, identify the characteristics of disabilities that effect development and growth, describe and demonstrate the correct application of crisis management techniques, identify policies and procedures governing direct care staff in human service agencies, and demonstrate knowledge of a human rights assessment strategy. In addition, graduates will learn basic healthcare procedures and techniques for working with medically fragile clients and obtain certifications in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) from the American Red Cross, and DMR Medication Administration. Finally, graduates will be able to conduct an ecological inventory, develop and write instructional objectives, use task analysis as an assessment tool, conduct data collection and display data through graphing, identify the essential elements and important considerations of the Overall Plan of Services used in program planning for persons with mental retardation, and be able to identify the components and uses of the Individualized Education Plan and demonstrate how it applies to the special education student in the classroom.