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Hartford Hospital's Paramedic Training Programs

Charter Oak State College building

Program Reviewed 2017

Hartford Hospital's Center for Education, Simulation, and Innovation, Department of Emergency Medical Services (CESI-EMS) Education Paramedic Program

Credits Available

  • Anatomy and Physiology I: 4 credits with laboratory, lower division level
  • Anatomy and Physiology II: 4 credits with laboratory, lower division level
  • Paramedic Clinical I: 3 credits, lower division level
  • Paramedic Clinical II: 3 credits, lower division level
  • Paramedic Clinical III: 3 credits, upper division level
  • Paramedic Field Internship: 6 credits, upper division level
  • Principles of Paramedic Practice I: 8 credits, lower division level
  • Principles of Paramedic Practice II: 8 credits, lower division level
  • Principles of Paramedic Practice III: 11 credits, upper division level
  • Principles of Paramedic Practice IV: 9 credits, upper division level

Dates Valid

July 2017 through June 2022

About the Training Sponsor

Hartford Hospital’s Center for Education, Simulation, and Innovation (CESI) is a 20,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art training facility.  It is one of the only facilities in the United States offering a fully comprehensive range of robotic and high technology training capabilities to a wide range of medical providers from virtually every medical specialty.Hartford Hospital’s Center for Education, Simulation, and Innovation (CESI) is a 20,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art training facility.  It is one of the only facilities in the United States offering a fully comprehensive range of robotic and high technology training capabilities to a wide range of medical providers from virtually every medical specialty.

Program Reviewed 2003

Hartford Hospital Department of EMS Education Paramedic Program

Credits Available

  • Anatomy and Physiology for the EMS Provider, January 2001 through February 2008: 3 credits, lower division level
  • Paramedic Clinical Experience, March 2001 through February 2008: 3 credits, lower division level
  • Principles of Paramedic Practice, January 2001 through February 2008: 19 credits, lower division level

Dates Valid

January 2001 through February 2008

About the Training Sponsor

Hartford Hospital's Department of Education was established in 1971, The Department of EMS Education, which is a part of the Hartford Hospital Department of Education, provides formal training in various EMS health disciplines. The mission of the Department of EMS Education is "To provide outstanding programs of education that are designed to encourage the acquisition of knowledge and skills that are of value to our community and the patients that we serve". Courses and programs are developed and revised based on the essentials set forth by the Department of Public Health and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Source of Records

Hartford Hospital; 80 Seymour Street; PO Box 5067; Hartford, CT 06102; 860-545-2564

Applying for the Credit

Have your training sponsor submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions, Valid July 2017 through June 2022

Anatomy and Physiology I: 4 credits with laboratory, lower division level
This course is a study of the human body and its biological organization specifically designed for students entering the emergency medicine service fields.  Students will learn the basic function of living organisms; identify the cellular levels of organization and the organ systems of the human body.  Emphasis will be placed on homeostasis as well as disease process.  Major Topics covered: Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body, Chemical Level of Organization, Cell Structure and Function, Tissue Level of Organization, Integumentary System, Skeletal System, Muscular System, Nervous System, General and Special Senses, and Endocrine System.

Anatomy and Physiology II: 4 credits with laboratory, lower division level
This course expands upon the knowledge acquired in Anatomy and Physiology I.  Students will concentrate on a systematic approach to the human organism, including the body as a whole, its major organ systems, their inter-elations and how they change throughout a person's life.  Additional emphasis will be placed on clinical and health related topic as they apply to the care of the patient in the emergency medical services field.  Major Topics covered: Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body, Cardiovascular System: Blood, Cardiovascular System: The Heart, Cardiovascular System: Blood Vessels, Lymphatic System and Immunity, Respiratory System, Digestive System, Urinary System, and Reproductive System.

Paramedic Clinical I: 3 credits, lower division level The paramedic clinical courses provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment.  The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients.  Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, but primarily in the emergency department.  Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program.  Students are required to spend 8 hours per week (15 weeks per semester) in the clinical setting.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Vascular Access, Airway Control, Medical Administration, and Behavioral Emergencies.

Paramedic Clinical II: 3 credits, lower division level The paramedic clinical courses provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment.  The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients.  Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, namely the Cardiac ICU, the Cardiac Cath Lab, but primarily in the emergency department.  Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program. Students are required to spend 8 hours per week (15 weeks per semester) in the clinical setting.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Vascular Access, Airway Control, Medical Administration, and Cardiac Emergencies.

Paramedic Clinical III: 3 credits, upper division level The paramedic clinical courses provide opportunities for students to apply what they are learning in their classroom and laboratory in a controlled clinical environment.  The clinical courses provide a vital link between the classroom and real-world patients.  Students work under the direct supervision of assigned clinical preceptors in a variety of settings, namely the Cardiac ICU, the Cardiac Cath Lab, but primarily in the emergency department.  Clinical experiences are taken concurrently with paramedic classroom work during respective semesters of the program.  Students are required to spend 8 hours per week (15 weeks per semester) in the clinical setting.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Vascular Access, Airway Control, Medical Administration, Respiratory Emergencies, Pediatric Emergencies, and OB Emergencies.

Paramedic Field Internship: 6 credits, upper division level The field internship provides students an opportunity to practice as entry-level paramedics under the direct supervision of approved field mentors (225 hours and 50 team leader calls).  This course provides the opportunity for students to practice their skills and application of learned knowledge, beginning in mid-May, while allowing for twice-weekly (starting mid-May to July) opportunities to share their experience with course faculty and peers, allowing for guided reflection, modification during practice, and vicarious learning from peers.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Vascular Access, Airway Control, Medical Administration, Respiratory Emergencies, Pediatric Emergencies, OB Emergencies, Cardiac Emergencies, and Neurological Emergencies.

Principles of Paramedic Practice I: 8 credits, lower division level
This course introduces students to the world of advanced life support (ALS) emergency medical services (EMS), as well as provides the students with a more comprehensive view of EMS systems and careers.  This course covers most of the national standard curriculum's "Preparatory" module and some of the "Operations" module.  Additionally, this course introduces students to some advanced life support skills and seeks to lay the foundations required for students to develop advanced operational and clinical decision-making skills.  A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies

Principles of Paramedic Practice II: 8 credits, lower division level
This course teaches students advanced pre-hospital care for cardiac emergencies with a particular emphasis on assessments, recognition, and life-saving interventions for acute medical disorders, students will apply learned concepts and be challenged to refine their operational and clinical decision-making skills, with an emphasis on clinical decision-making in medical settings.  This course covers the "Medical" module of the National EMS Educational Standards.  A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Cardiology, Cardiac Pharmacology, Advanced Cardiac Life Support.

Principles of Paramedic Practice III: 11 credits, upper division level
This course instructs students in the proper techniques for advanced patient assessment.  After completing the assessment portion, students are introduced to advanced medical and trauma care, reviewing concepts related to traumatic injury patterns, and paramedic trauma procedures.  The course challenges students to refine their operational and clinical decision-making skills with an emphasis on clinical decision-making in trauma settings.  The course covers the "Patient Assessment" and "Trauma" modules of the national EMS Education Standards, as well as one component of the "Special Considerations" module.  A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.  Major Topics covered: Patient Assessment, Respiratory Emergencies, Endocrine Emergencies, Allergies/Anaphylaxis, GI Emergencies, Hematologic Emergencies, Urologic Emergencies, Neurologic Emergencies,  Psychiatric Emergencies, Toxicology, Environmental Emergencies,  Trauma, Head, Neck, Spine, Chest, Abdominal and extremity injuries.

Principles of Paramedic Practice IV: 9 credits, upper division level
This course is designed to refine the skills and knowledge of the advanced paramedic student.  The course covers special situations and special populations the paramedic faces in the field.  The course is designed to run concurrently with the Paramedic Field Internship, allowing students to take advantage of the opportunity to integrate their field experience with the classroom.  This course covers the "Special Considerations" and portions of the "Operations" modules of the paramedic national Educational Standards.  A laboratory component provides students with an opportunity to practice and develop required competencies.  Major Topics covered: Gynecological Emergencies, Obstetrics, Neonatal Resuscitation, Pediatrics, Geriatrics, Incident Command, Disaster Medicine, Toxicology, Hazardous Materials, and Assessment Based Management.

Course Descriptions, Valid January 2001 through February 2008

Anatomy and Physiology for the EMS Provider, January 2001 through February 2008: 3 credits, lower division level
This course is designed to provide an EMS provider with knowledge of Anatomy and Physiology, with attention paid to how this knowledge is applied in the pre-hospital setting. A systematic approach to the human organism is used, including the body as a whole, its major organ systems, their inter-relations, and how they change throughout a person's life. Instruction is via a mixture of lecture and discussion.

Paramedic Clinical Experience, March 2001 through February 2008: 3 credits, lower division level
This course is designed to instruct students to become competent, confident, entry-level paramedics. This course consists of clinical rotations at a variety of clinical sites, under supervision of approved preceptors, supplemented by lecture/discussion sessions.

Principles of Paramedic Practice, January 2001 through February 2008: 19 credits, lower division level
Designed to instruct students to become competent, confident, entry-level paramedics. This course is a mixture of lecture/discussion and lab experiences including field-performance based scenarios, procedure practice on manikins, role-playing, and other psychomotor activities.