Institute of Health Sciences Electroneurodiagnostic Technology Program

Institute of Health Sciences Electroneurodiagnostic Technology Program

Credits Available

  • END 101 Fundamentals of Healthcare for the END Technologist (1 credit, lower division level)
  • END 102 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology I (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 103 Clinical Practicum I (2 credits, lower division level)
  • END 201 Neuroanatomy and Physiology for the END Technologist (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 202 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology II (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 203 Clinical Practicum II (2 credits, lower division level)
  • END 301 Neurological Disorders I (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 302 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology III (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 303 Clinical Practicum III (2 credits, lower division level)
  • END 401 Neurological Disorders II (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 402 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology IV (3 credits, lower division level)
  • END 403 Clinical Practicum IV (2 credits, lower division level)
  • IOM 404: Monitoring Modalities I Electroencephalography and Electrocorticography (3 credits, lower division level; November 2015 through August 2021)
  • IOM 405: Clinical Capstone (2 credits, lower division level; November 2015 through August 2021)

Dates Valid

August 2014 through August 2021

November 2015 through August 2021 for the two newer Intraoperative Monitoring (IOM) courses

Source of Records

Institute of Health Sciences; 11031 McCormick Road, Hunt Valley, MD 21031

About the Training Sponsor

The Institute of Health Sciences (IHS) is a private allied health school providing hybrid distance education. Students receive didactic instruction online through Webstudy, a web based management system that allows for 24/7 access to classes and materials, and resident clinical training at accredited neurology laboratories.

Applying for the Credit

Have IHS submit your transcript or record to the Registrar to apply for the credit.

Course Descriptions

END101 Fundamentals of Healthcare for the END Technologist (1 credit, lower division level)
This course is designed to prepare students for working in a health care setting. The course focuses on various aspects of Electroneurodiagnostic (END) and other allied health professions. Major components include nervous systems and other relevant medical terminology, infection control practices and patient safety assessments. Students are also introduced to the historical perspectives of END as well as The Scope of Practice of an END Technologist and related professional ethics.

END102 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology I (3 credits, lower division level)
This course provides students with the fundamental concepts necessary for performing routine EEGs. Students become familiar with the published guidelines for performing adult EEG and learn the basic concepts of montage development, history taking, activation procedures performed along with the disadvantages and contraindications. Students learn to describe and identify normal awake and sleep patterns.

END103 Clinical Practicum I (2 credits, lower division level)
The clinical practicum portion of the program provides ongoing clinical experience and allows students to demonstrate clinical competency in performing basic EEG skills and routine EEG testing procedures. Students learn about various departmental operations and are oriented to END lab equipment as well as to lab policies and procedures. Students work 1:1 with a registered technologist who assesses the student daily on clinical competencies. At the completion of this course, students are able to accurately perform a routine EEG on a cooperative patient in 2 hours or less according to the ACNS guidelines. Students are required to spend a minimum of 15 clock hours a week in the clinical setting.

END201 Neuroanatomy and Physiology for the END Technologist (3 credits, lower division level)
This course is designed for the student enrolled in the Electroneurodiagnostic Technology program who has completed at least one semester in the clinical setting. Students learn and can demonstrate knowledge of the organizational levels associated with anatomy and physiology along with directional and anatomical terms associated with other organ systems. Students receive a basic overview of the anatomy and physiology of the nervous system. They become familiar with Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology basics required to perform END testing procedure, including anatomical terminology to describe body direction, surfaces and body planes; directional terms; various types of tissue and body membranes; the structures, functions and classifications of the nervous system; and the types and functions of general sensory receptors.

END202 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology II (3 credits, lower division level)
This course expands on the basic concepts learning in END102. It includes maturation of the EEG, abnormal patterns, and patterns of unknown significance. This course also covers the basic concepts of polarity and localization and filters. Students are required to demonstrate their knowledge of various epileptiform EEG patterns including spikes, sharp waves, periodic complexes, as well as abnormal non-epileptiform patterns of the adult. Students are also required to demonstrate knowledge of pediatric EEG patterns from the premature infant through adult. Students demonstrate methods to localize events using polarity rules and gain knowledge of more complex EEGs and the method used in recoding these EEGs based on the ACNS guidelines.

END203 Clinical Practicum II (2 credits, lower division level)
This course is a continuation of END103, combining academic information with clinical experience, practicing learned skills in real clinical situations. It allows students to expand the technical skills and knowledge they gained in Level I. The course provides ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for EEG procedures. Students learn ACNS Guidelines for more complex EEG recordings, such as cerebral brain death studies and pediatric recording requirements. They learn more advanced pattern recognition, interpretation and recording skills to better correlated clinical conditions with test results. They explore recording strategies and parameter selections as they relate to special studies; they learn about the basic effects of medications in END studies, as well as sedation practices and common medications, primarily antiepileptic drugs, and their effects on the EEG.

END301 Neurological Disorders I (3 credits, lower division level)
This course provides detailed information on a variety of neurological disorders, nerve conditions studies and evoked potential testing. Students learn about the key components of the Neurological Exam, have a general review of the nervous system, and learn specific information about the central nervous system and abnormalities that affect the CNS such as Neoplasm, infections and trauma. Students also learn about the various levels of consciousness and clinical signs associated with impaired consciousness and coma. They receive detailed information about peripheral nervous system and nerve conduction testing used to evaluate the peripheral nervous system. In-depth information about conditions such as multiple sclerosis, demylenating diseases, and spinal cord disease is also included in this course, with a general overview of the different types of Evoked Potential testing procedures.

END302 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology III (3 credits, lower division level)
This course is a continuation of END202. It is designed to prepare students for the duties involved in performing advanced END procedures. Students acquire the clinical and technical information necessary to perform Advanced EEG recordings including those studies performed on patients with seizure disorders. The course focuses on EEG interpretation as associated with seizure disorders, epileptiform abnormalities, and artifact recognition. Students gain an understanding of the types of seizures, epileptic syndromes, the various testing procedures and testing outcomes necessary to evaluate patients with seizures. The course content includes information about generalized and focal seizures, epileptic syndromes, and treatment options for the patient with seizures, along with details regarding the different types of monitoring available for the determination of the type of seizures. Students receive a general introduction to the basics of digital EEG concepts including digital signals and advanced recording procedures, including LTM, ICU Monitoring, and AEEG.

END303 Clinical Practicum III (2 credits, lower division level)
This course is a continuation of END203. It allows students to expand the technical skills and knowledge acquired in that course, providing ongoing clinical instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for routine and advanced EEG procedures. Students acquire the clinical and technical information necessary to perform Advanced EEG recordings including those studies performed on patients with seizure disorders, and work on expanding their pattern recognition skills.

END401 Neurological Disorders II (3 credits, lower division level)
This course is a continuation of END301. Included in this course are topics such as cerebrovascular diseases, metabolic/toxic disorders, coma and impairment of consciousness, tumors, developmental disorders, headaches, dizziness and vertigo. In addition, students learn about the various types of intra-operative monitoring (IOM) being done throughout Neurodiagnostic centers nationwide. Students learn the indications for surgical monitoring in IOM neurosurgical procedures, including the expected changes that can occur and outcomes seen with these procedures.

END402 Electroneurodiagnostic Technology IV (3 credits, lower division level)
This course is a continuation of END302. Students continue to build on their pattern recognition skills and advanced END recording procedures. In addition, students learn the basics of Polysomnography in order to meet the graduate competencies including recognition of sleep stages, montages used in Polysomnography, basic understanding of common sleep disorders, and the requirements for performing a technically adequate PSG recording. Students gain an understanding of testing procedures, outcomes, and treatment of a variety of sleeping/waking disorders, and learn to identify normal sleep architecture along with abnormalities in respiratory and cardiac events.

END 403 Clinical Practicum IV (2 credits, lower division level)
This course provides ongoing instruction and an evaluation method for students to demonstrate clinical competency for EEG procedures. The course is a continuation of END303, and allows students to expand the technical skills and knowledge they have previously gained. It affords students the opportunity to integrate what is being learned in other course areas into the clinical spectrum, to develop more complex pattern recognition and interpretation skills, and to obtain an understanding of the technically challenging concepts and skills associated with advanced recording procedures. Students are also exposed to other END procedures performed in the END laboratory.

IOM 404: Monitoring Modalities I Electroencephalography and Electrocorticography (3 credits, lower division level; November 2015 through August 2021)
This course focuses specifically on the application and performance of intra-operative electroencephalography and electrocorticography monitoring modalities.  The types of electrodes used, application techniques, recording montages, equipment and instrumentation are discussed.  The course also covers guideline criteria and the effects of anesthetic agents.

IOM 405: Clinical Capstone (2 credits, lower division level; November 2015 through August 2021)
The clinical capstone is a combination of online didactic instruction and technical skills performed in the hospital setting.  Students build skills with clinical practice, ensuring the application of didactic instruction in the clinical setting.  Students learn about the various hospital departments, policies and procedures, teamwork, the importance of performing accurate tests, the significance of documentation and effective communication, establishing patient rapport, and ensuring patient safety, among other principles.  Students learn to establish a professional method of communicating with patients and hospital staff.  Students learn how to work collaboratively with the anesthesia team, communicate concisely and accurately with the surgeon and how to work with the oversight physician using a HIPAA compliant virtual private network.